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Accelerate! with Andy Paul

“Accelerate Your Sales Power.” Are you completely satisfied with your sales performance? Then Accelerate! your sales skills, leadership traits, and personal development, with sought-after speaker, best-selling author and sales sage, Andy Paul. Six times a week, Andy interviews the world’s foremost sales minds and extraordinarily interesting people like Jeffrey Gitomer, Robert Cialdini, Jill Konrath, Anthony Iannarino and Tim Sanders -- to uncover the strategies and insights you can use to generate massive value for your customers and epic wins for you. Get inspired with proven strategies to bust through limiting mindsets, amplify your value to buyers and outsell the competition. Whether you’re a sales leader, AE, AM, SDR, CEO, or entrepreneur, YOU want to generate better leads, close more sales and grow your accounts, and Accelerate! is the preeminent podcast for fast breakthroughs. Check out our growing catalog of 350+ hard-hitting episodes now.
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Feb 14, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Verne Harnish, Founder of The Gazelles, a leading business coach, bestselling author of Mastering the Rockefeller Habits: What You Must Do to Increase the Value of Your Growing Firm, and most recently, Scaling Up: How a Few Companies Make It…and Why the Rest Don't, as well as Founder of the Entrepreneurs’ Organization. Among the many topics that Verne and I discuss are the challenges blocking startups from scaling up and his advice for accelerating your growth.

Feb 13, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Diana Geairn, The Irreverent Salesgirl. Among the many topics that Diana and I discuss are Diana’s intention to restore dignity to the profession of sales, how and why she uses a musical stage production with animation to teach sales principles, some sales myths Diana debunks, and, how a company becomes sales ready.

Feb 12, 2017

**  Originally released on January 10th, 2017  **

 

Welcome to Sales Kick-Off Week on Accelerate!

Joining me on Day Two of The Accelerate! Virtual Sales Kick-off Week is my guest Jill Konrath.

Jill Konrath is a speaker, sales expert, and author of multiple best-selling books, including her most recent offering: More Sales, Less Time: Surprisingly Simple Strategies For Today's Crazy-Busy Sellers.

On Day Two of our 2017 Virtual Sales Kick-off Meeting, we’re going to focus on your personal productivity.

In this episode, Jill shares some essential tips and techniques to help you, the sales professional, jump-start your productivity in 2017. She provides time-saving and time-creating strategies that you can immediately put to use to stay focused and become more productive amidst the chaos of your daily sales life.

Want more selling time in 2017? Then listen to this episode now!

(Note: in this podcast, Andy refers to the previous episode with Jill Konrath as Episode 319, released on December 1. A scheduling change was necessary after the recording. The previous episode with Jill Konrath is Episode 331, released on December 15, 2016.)

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:16] Jill says the single biggest challenge facing sales reps in 2017 is ‘overwhelm.’ Sales reps are constantly running behind, in a time-draining digital swamp.

[3:16] Newly-added technologies take time to learn and may not connect with each other. The more time you spend online, the more overwhelmed you feel.

[5:44] Learn to segregate sales activities and online activities into different time blocks, and not to mix them.

[5:59] Research shows that constantly jumping in and out of email lowers female IQ by five points, and male IQ by fifteen points. Being addicted to email literally saps your intelligence.

[7:01] Jill researched physical and social sciences for her book More Sales, Less Time. One study showed the top 10% producers worked for an average of 52 minutes, then went off on a non-electronic physical break before returning to work.

[10:28] Trigger events, either within an organization, or external to it, suddenly change the organization’s priorities. Jill gives examples of internal and external triggers that change organizational goals and lead to sales opportunities.

[11:41] A sales professional who tracks specific triggers, can start a conversation before their competitors know about it.

[12:55] Be the prospect’s first contact, with your viable vision when it is needed, and you have a 74% chance of winning the business. People buy what is ‘good enough.’

[14:29] Plan a campaign at the start, including pre-written appropriate email messages, to roll out over the next month. Don’t rethink each contact step. Leverage your activities.

[18:15] Examine where the prospect is. Be rigorous with yourself. Do not delude yourself into thinking you have more opportunities than truly are there. Unclog the pipeline.

[20:59] Each morning, take a few minutes to ‘go quiet.’ Focus, settle into where you want to spend your time.

[22:57] Go quiet before a prospect meeting. Cut distractions, to be more present in the meeting. They’ll feel the difference in you, leading to a different conversation, and a higher level of trust.

MORE ABOUT JILL KONRATH

Is it easier to teach a technical non-salesperson how to sell, or to teach a salesperson how to sell a technical product?
I would take a technical person and show them the system and the process, because there is a methodology for sales, and technical people are more likely to follow the system.

If you could change one thing about your business self, what would it be?
I can’t think of anything. I kind of like how I am. It took a full year for me to try out some of the strategies in the book, and see my results. It took time to pull it together, to become a whole way of working.

Do you have a favorite quotation, or words of wisdom, you live by?
“Never believe in never,” ― Robert Schuller. That has created new ways of looking at things for me, and not giving up.

CONTACT JILL KONRATH

Text: Text the word Sales to 44144 to participate in a seven-part More Sales, Less Time video challenge.

Amazon: More Sales, Less Time: Surprisingly simple strategies for today's crazy-busy sellers, by Jill Konrath

Feb 11, 2017

Joining me once again on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Ken Thoreson, President of Acumen Management Group, and author of several books on sales, sales management, hiring, and personal development. Ken’s latest book is, SLAMMED!!! For the First Time Sales Manager.

Feb 10, 2017

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest and honorary co-host, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss resilience, why you need it in sales, tips that help you develop it; ideas to lift your sights, such as tracking small victories; and the suggestion to help others reach their own objectives.

Feb 9, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Travis Truett, Co-Founder and CEO of Ambition, an enterprise-grade sales productivity platform.

Feb 8, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Sam Richter, Founder and CEO of SBR Worldwide/Know More, and author of the bestseller called, Take the Cold Out of Cold Calling.

Feb 7, 2017

Joining me once again on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Elinor Stutz, an author, speaker, and consultant. She is author of the book, Nice Girls DO Get The Sale: Relationship Building That Gets Results, and, more recently, The Wish: A 360-Degree Business Development Process That Fuels Sales.

Feb 6, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Andrea Austin, Vice President of Enterprise Sales at InsideView, and the co-author of a brand new book called Aligned to Achieve: How to Unite Your Sales and Marketing Teams into a Single Force for Growth.

Feb 5, 2017

**  Originally released on December 15th, 2017  **

 

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my friend Jill Konrath. Jill is a speaker, sales expert, and author of multiple bestselling books, including Selling to Big Companies, Snap Selling, Agile Selling, and her latest book, More Sales, Less Time. Among the many topics that Jill and I discuss are how she came to focus on selling more in less time, what she learned from her research about concentration, focus and how to eliminate distraction that waste selling time, how to make the most of the limited hours available each, and how you can take the More Sales, Less Time Challenge.

 

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:19] After Jill wrote SNAP Selling, about selling to frazzled customers, readers asked her how to simplify their own lives. She had no idea how to help them, so she researched it.

[6:37] Research shows multitasking is an illusion. Learn what happens when you try to jump between two tasks and refocus your attention.

[8:20] How often the average sales person checks their cell phone each day. And how each interruption reduces productivity.

[8:40] To write More Sales, Less Time, Jill used herself as a test subject for the before and after metrics for each new strategy she tried.

[10:44] Jill shares how using your willpower impacts your ability to make decisions.

[14:20] Jill’s Time Master Manifesto sets rules to manage time, starting with getting seven-and-a-half hours of sleep nightly.

[17:28] How you should start each business day before turning on your computer and checking your email.

[20:12] Two books to assist salespeople in learning how to prioritize are Essentialism, and The One Thing.

[24:03] Challenge the status quo at all times, looking for a better way to achieve the end result.

[25:00] Jill shares the value of scheduling your activities into blocks of time. You are most productive while focusing on one activity.

 

MORE ABOUT JILL KONRATH

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
The quality of my questions. They’re penetrating; they’re insightful; they make people think; and I get a lot of good information that I can then translate into what I share later.

Who is your sales role model?
Neil Rackham, when I started, but today it’s new territory, and I scan a lot of people, and pick and choose what I need.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
There are so many. It depends on what you’re selling, and what you need at a particular time.

What music is on your playlist right now?

Podcasts only, but when I write, the Focus@Will app.

 

CONTACT JILL KONRATH

Jill invites you to take the More Sales, Less Time Challenge!

To start, text to 44144, the message, Sales

Website: Jill Konrath

Feb 4, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Jeremy Reeves, the CEO of Kaizen Marketing, and host of the marketing podcast, Sales Funnel Mastery.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:09] Jeremy sells by words, as a sales copywriter, through websites and emails, anticipating and overcoming objections without talking. He has helped clients generate roughly $50M.

[5:33] How does sales automation affect sales? Buyers buy some items for thousands of dollars, without personal contact, but does it maximize the sale?

[8:11] Jeremy recalls a client’s experience with a two-step online lead generation campaign. They had a salesperson call prospects who stopped at the first step. With a call, the client increased their qualified leads by 50% over their online results.

[11:00] Is the sales funnel, either online, or face-to-face, becoming obsolete? Jeremy suggests adding more relevancy by segmenting it into specific audiences — multiple funnels.

[15:15] Is Sales losing its value to buyers in an era of near perfect information?

[17:56] Recently, Jeremy has seen an emphasis on building relationships, or engagement. People respond to relatable, emotional vulnerability, in your stories that teach lessons.

[22:02] Jeremy puts personal relatable events into his emails, to create engagement. His copywriting is about getting people to know, like, and trust you and your product.

[25:05] In the current wave of disruption in sales, automation is not creating the necessary human engagement. Relatability is the missing ingredient.

[26:36] Jeremy is working on a new product, and he shares his progress in stories via email with his prospects. He is getting great responses from people looking forward to this product.

[27:35] A story transitions to a lesson, adding value, that transitions to the product. Jeremy gives an impromptu example. Stories work well, for face-to-face, or by email.

[33:08] Showing vulnerability through personal stories helps people relate to you, better than to the ‘robot’ that just visited with a script that didn’t speak to them personally. No one wants to talk to a salesperson, but they’ll talk to a friend.

[36:48] We all have stories. Look for them. A made-up story is inauthentic, so talk about real events, and memories, and real emotions, that lead to real lessons, to sell your real product.

MORE ABOUT JEREMY REEVES

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
I go after prospects who know copy, but don’t want to do it, so my main goal is to have as minimal edits as possible.

Who is your sales role model?
Zig Ziglar.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
Getting Everything You Can Out of All You've Got: 21 Ways You Can Out-Think, Out-Perform, and Out-Earn the Competition,
by Jay Abraham.

What music is on your playlist right now?

Country, for everyday. Breaking Benjamin, for workouts.

CONTACT JEREMY REEVES

Podcast: Sales Funnel Mastery

Website: JeremyReeves.com

Feb 3, 2017

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest (and Front Line Friday co-host), Bridget Gleason, VP of Sales for Logz.io.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:43] Bridget likes to finish with the panic before the end of the year. The last two weeks of the year, reps say, “I don’t have anything else to close this quarter.” Bridget says, “So start building up to where you need to be for the next quarter.”

[2:56] By the end of January, Bridget likes reps to be well on the way to meeting their first quarter goals. As VP of Sales, Bridget needs to have the year’s structure — territories, hiring, ramping — all set, to focus on the year’s success.

[4:45] Bridget sometimes postpones personnel issues until the new year, to focus on finishing the year well, but, as soon as possible in the year, has that difficult conversation.

[6:08] Andy says to have those conversations back in October or November — because the problem is evident by then — so you have the team composition in place that you need by January.

[7:01] In sales, the data identifies there’s something that’s not working. Millennials in particular, would like ongoing feedback. If managers provide feedback often and early, then the final conversation isn’t as difficult, because it’s not a surprise.

[8:58] Andy wants to see successes in January — milestones, closes, shared successes — to build team confidence. It is crucial to keep the team motivated.

[12:20] Angela Duckworth’s, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, says great performers are often made by the team, as opposed to great players making the team great. Bridget wants a team that makes people better for being on it.

[13:13] Andy believes a team gives you more people to hold you accountable, because no one wants to let their teammates down. Everybody wants to contribute.

[15:30] Bridget ‘feels that in spades,’ about her company, Logz.io. Team accountability applies not only to sales professionals, but to all levels of a company. It’s a mesh.

[16:35] What has inspired Bridget recently? Angela Duckworth’s book on grit, teaches that intelligence matters, but if others are smarter than we are, we can do a lot to counter that by persistence, and by hard work.

[18:19] Bridget shares a story of a personal sacrifice made by one of her managers, with quiet determination, to help close out the big year-end deals. Some sacrifices are needed and appreciated, without apparent martyrdom attached.

[23:05] In the first month, pay attention to what’s going on; get early successes for the team; and deal with problems, regardless of sunk cost, whether personnel, or projects that will never close. Take a hard look at everything.

CONTACT BRIDGET GLEASON

Bridget is VP of Sales with Logz.io, in the U.S. office in Boston, and was previously VP of Corporate Sales at SumoLogic. Prior to that her recent experience includes being VP of Sales for Yesware and SVP of Worldwide Sales for Engine Yard. She can be contacted at Bridget@Logz.io.

LinkedIn: Bridget Gleason

Send your questions for Andy and Bridget to Andy@ZeroTimeSelling.com.

Feb 2, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Timo Rein, Co-Founder of Pipedrive, which is one of the leading CRM systems for SMB (Small and Midsized Business).

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:19] After about a decade in sales consultancy, Timo Rein co-founded Pipedrive in 2010, to help salespeople around the world to manage complex sales processes.
[2:52] Timo grew up in the Soviet Union, which collapsed when he was a teen. The fall was hard on his grandparents and parents, whose pensions were lost. Timo was excited to be part of the nation of Estonia, independent again in 1991.

[6:21] Timo looked at the sales management tools available in 2000, and after a costly implementation for a business, found his sales people were still using sticky notes, instead of the CRM.

[7:34] Customers asked him about putting analog-style tracking tools into software, and that started them on the path to creating Pipedrive, as a tool to benefit salespeople.

[11:59] Pipedrive’s model is self-serve SaaS, so anyone in a company can use it. In some cases, management sees this usage, and makes it an enterprise purchase.

[13:12] The look and feel of Pipedrive is unique. It attempts to strike the balance between functionality and simplicity. It is a daily sales productivity tool, not just a reporting tool.

[15:23] What management wants, at the end of the day, is to sell in such a way that the focus is in the right place, most of the time. Pipedrive helps salespeople focus on the right opportunities — more on sales, than on engagements.

[18:15] The intent of Pipedrive is to close deals by the process of moving a contact from prospect to customer, helping you control your activities, to become more successful in sales.

[21:02] You can look at sales productivity mathematically. Performance is measured against results for a given period. Tools are productive if they move you towards results.

[26:10] Instead of focusing on the average sales cycle length (a result), if management saw the sales hours going into the cycle, they could focus on sales hours and actions, (controlled factors), to reduce the sales cycle length.

[27:43] Simplicity of use of the tool is important to getting the salespeople to use it. If it is not being used, it is not helping. If used, it helps performance, but the next step is helping real sales productivity.

[29:20] Business software was once considered difficult and clunky, but is now becoming consumerized. Categories of tools are blending. The more functions one interface can address simply, the better chances it has for adoption.

MORE ABOUT TIMO REIN

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
The process of finding the tool, and getting it up and running, on your own.

Who is your sales role model?
A number of influencers, but anybody who dares to be themselves in sales.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
The New Common Denominator of Success, by Albert E.N. Gray.

What music is on your playlist right now?

The Beatles, George Ezra, Thomas Leeb, The Byrds.

CONTACT TIMO REIN

Website: Pipedrive.com for a trial

Feb 1, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Chris Brogan, CEO of Owner Media Group (which provides skills for the modern entrepreneur), a highly sought-after professional speaker, and the New York Times bestselling author of nine books and counting, his latest being, Find Your Writing Voice.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:54] Chris introduces his book coming out, called Make Your Own Game. The book has two sections. First is The Fast Book, for people who believe they are too busy to read. Second is The Real Book, for those who want it all.

[2:51] Make Your Own Game first teaches how to win a game, seeing it as story (who, what, and why you are playing), rules (how to play), and strategy (how to win). Second, it teaches how to create your own story, rules, and strategy.

[3:30] Some companies may say innovation is important, but then they retreat to, “That’s not the way we do it.” Innovation assumes risk, but proposes reward, and includes breaking out of the blue binder on the shelf.

[5:44] Chris tells how doing something extra on Facebook to connect, led to a third party’s offering him a business deal.

[6:33] There is a conflict in sales organizations between optimization of process and reporting through Big Data tools, and creating and nurturing human connections. Dashboards help, but people buy from people they know, like, and trust.

[10:31] It’s easy to see on social media what people’s interests are. Google your contact before your sales meeting. Find out what will help understand them better, and bond together.

[13:03] Your buyers are all involved in things outside the sale. There is great value in small talk. Chris would like to see it codified into systems. He admits to personally getting too familiar, too quickly, though.

[15:20] Teaching authenticity is like scripting improv.

[17:16] Andy suggests doing what you need, to be one percent better than the next guy. As the sales professional, you — not the price — are the first differentiation. Be your best you.

[18:44] Sales professionals need to spend more time learning about their clients and connecting to them. Uniquely human skills make the sale. Don’t show you are busy, show you are responsive to them.

[25:18] Sales is not about metric-driven methodologies. It’s about people. The biggest challenge in any sales organization is engaging with the prospect. It’s hard to put metrics on a sales rep’s ability to get others to ‘know, like, and trust’ them.

[29:47] Sales professionals, like most people, want to have a system. The sales challenge is to learn a really simple system to win the sale. Chris wants his book to help people with this, using self-permission.

MORE ABOUT CHRIS BROGAN

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
Straightforward nature.

Who is your sales role model?
Zig Ziglar.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
Business Stripped Bare: Adventures of a Global Entrepreneur, by Sir Richard Branson.

What music is on your playlist right now?

Loud positive music. “Fighter,” and “No Plan B,” by Manafest. ‘90s Hip Hop.

 

CONTACT CHRIS BROGAN

Website: ChrisBrogan.com

Website: Owner.Media

Google: Chris

Jan 31, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Trevor Turnbull, Owner of Linked Into Leads, online reputation strategist, LinkedIn trainer, keynote speaker, and owner of the 30 Day Sales Machine program.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:51] Trevor’s agency, Linked Into Leads, is in Vancouver. 98% of their clients are outside of Vancouver. They generate leads, using LinkedIn to turn cold leads into warm prospects.

[3:56] Trevor uses LinkedIn as a tool — a massive database of opportunities — to get his clients in front of their audience at the right time in the buying process. Trevor teaches methods for effectiveness.

[4:50] Trevor has a degree in marketing, but went straight into sales in 2003, cold calling from the Yellow Pages. In 2009, he started using LinkedIn for social selling, human to human.

[7:19] Tip: make sure your profile photo is professional. Don’t treat LinkedIn as an online résumé. Those who view your profile want to know how you can help them, but you have just six seconds to capture their attention.

[8:07] In a LinkedIn campaign, use laser focus. Specifically aim for your target persona, and speak to them directly about pain points, with headline, summary, and supporting media.

[13:31] The 30 Day Sales Machine is a marketing cycle program for a LinkedIn campaign of 1000 connection requests (50 per day), and replying to responses. Use a dedicated email account for a campaign.

[16:45] Don’t just join LinkedIn groups of your peers. Join groups of your target buyers. You have to request to join. Let the group admin know what value you offer to them.

[20:31] In a LinkedIn campaign, define your searches, and save the searches for further filtering.

[23:14] TIP: Use the permission method for connecting: Thank you for visiting my profile. I’m looking to expand my network in the (blank) space, here in (blank). Would you be open to connecting on LinkedIn? This gets much better response than the generic request.

[25:48] If the person accepts, follow up with a message that doesn’t ask for anything: Great to have you in my network, I look forward to sharing ideas. If there’s anybody I can help connect you with, don’t hesitate to ask.

[27:08] Differentiate yourself and start a conversation with a second follow-up such as: I’m looking to get some feedback from decision makers such as yourself on the challenges they’re facing with (blank). Some of your peers have said this …

MORE ABOUT TREVOR TURNBULL

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
Authenticity. I’m an open book, in this to help people.

Who is your sales role model?
I follow a number of people online, including Grant Cardone,
Eric Lofholm, and Gary Vaynerchuk.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
Sales Scripting Mastery: The 7-Step System for Consistently Delivering Successful Sales Presentations, by Eric Lofholm.

What music is on your playlist right now?

Chill music. Anything Bob Marley.

CONTACT TREVOR TURNBULL

Google: Trevor Turnbull

Website: TrevorTurnbull.com

Website: LinkedIntoLeads.com

Website: 30DaySalesMachine.com

Jan 30, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Frank Cespedes, Senior Lecturer at Harvard Business School, and author of the book Aligning Strategy and Sales: The Choices, Systems, and Behaviors that Drive Effective Selling, as well as numerous articles on the Harvard Business Review about sales.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:53] Frank was a business school professor, researching marketing and sales. Then he ran a tech firm for 12 years, sold it, and returned to Harvard to teach strategy.

[4:57] Frank mentions a McKinsey study on the effects of the 2008 recession. Companies cut the costs of goods sold, but selling & general administrative (SG&A) expenses, as a percentage of sales, have risen.

[6:30] Companies have done a good job of cutting operations costs, but have done less well with efficiencies in going to market. Productivity studies are now focusing on those costs.

[7:20] The availability of more accessible data shows clearly what it means to be a sales leader in the 21st Century. The CFO and C-suite can see easily what is happening for the enormous amount of money spent on sales.

[8:34] There is a misplaced focus on the number of activities, which means thinking about quantity, rather than quality. Activity is not outcome. Sales is about outcomes. Closed sales count.

[10:58] Andy refers to Absolute Value: What Really Influences Customers in the Age of (Nearly) Perfect Information, by Itamar Simonson and Emanuel Rosen, who say buyers are adept at capturing and understanding the information they need.

[14:31] In the business value chain, from sourcing to service, sales is the most specialized factor. In any industry, what works in sales at Company A, may not work selling at Company B, but sales is the factor most seen as generalized.

[17:28] The SaaS sales model took off in 2008, when it was mandatory to cut back on go-to-market costs. Any successful model is about the entire process. New models constantly disrupt mature models.

[22:28] Every generation relearns basic truisms. Putting new names on old processes can work, if it moves the meter in the right direction.

[24:58] Frank says studies support that 80% or more of sales come from 20% of salespeople. Performance variance in sales is greater than in many other areas of business.

[28:29] Frank’s tips to improve sales outcomes: improve hiring practices, including behavioral assessments; hold regular real performance reviews; use training and development, tracked.

MORE ABOUT FRANK CESPEDES

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
I knew what I was talking about, with the product, and customer issues it solved.

Who is your sales role model?
It was a number of people I had seen, admired, and respected, and I said, I can do that.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
Neil Rackham’s book SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-Payoff.

What music is on your playlist right now?

I am a big fan of Jazz music. Pianist Bill Charlap and his trio.

 

CONTACT FRANK CESPEDES

Website: FrankCespedes.com

LinkedIn: FrankCespedes

Jan 28, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Barry Demp, Founder of Barry Demp Coaching, and author of an interesting book, called, The Quotable Coach: Daily Nuggets of Practical Wisdom. Among the many topics that Barry and I discuss are how a coaching relationship differs from a management relationship, why it’s essential to connect with the vision and values of your people, and how to find fulfillment in your work.  

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:50] Barry taught Science for two years in the Philadelphia Public Schools. He moved into pharmaceuticals in sales and marketing for 12-1/2 years, for Upjohn. Barry left in 1992.

[2:48] Barry was moved by the Barcelona Olympic Games. A documentary on athletes and coaches inspired him to bring coaching to business, which he has been doing for 24 years.

[7:09] In a coaching relationship, people promise action to fulfill a future goal they intend to achieve. They lead themselves to the future they desire. Old-school management is, my job is to get you to go where I need you, like it, or not.

[9:33] When people’s vision and values connect with the organization, they see work can be an expression of themselves, and they engage with it, and are fulfilled by that community, and they build it up to mutual benefit.

[13:16] The balance begins with relationships. Quality relationships underlie quality results. Knowing your employees, and their values, are drivers of human behavior. “We’re not a machine anymore,” ― Seth Godin.

[23:48] Barry’s book is developed from his blog. Andy notes selected quotes: “You’re more likely to act yourself into
feeling, than feel yourself into action.” ― Jerome Bruner.
Start something!

[25:47] “People are anxious to improve their circumstances, but they’re unwilling to improve themselves. They therefore remain bound.” ― James Allen. Invest in yourself!

[27:10] “Don’t stumble over something behind you”
― Seneca the Younger. Where do we live — past, present, or future? Be present in the moment, and step into the future!

[28:34] “Death is Nature’s advice to get plenty of life.”
― Goethe. Life is finite. Get the most out of it!

[30:06] “Our chief want in life is somebody who will make us do what we can.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson. The ability to take a stand for other people is a remarkably powerful place!

[31:30] “If you chase two rabbits, both will escape.”
― Author Unknown. Choose and focus! The most productive people are highly-focused, not multi-taskers.

[32:33] “Instead of seeking new landscapes, develop new eyes.” ― Marcel Proust. Perception is reality. If we perceive things in new ways, we create new realities!

 

MORE ABOUT BARRY DEMP

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
Authenticity and being genuine.

Who is your sales role model?
People who walk their talk, have integrity, and sincerity, but also have a level of courage to stand for what’s important and valuable for themselves.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
I’m a book addict. A book that I read just recently is A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry to Spark Breakthrough Ideas, by Warren Berger.

What music is on your playlist right now?

I tend to listen most to Contemporary Jazz on my XM Radio, to relax.

 

CONTACT BARRY DEMP

Phone: (248) 740-3231

Google: google.com/Barry Demp

Website: TheQuotableCoach.com Sign Up for Free!

LinkedIn: BarryDemp

Website: DempCoaching.com

Jan 27, 2017

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss the eight great sales books most frequently recommended by my guests, how your team or organization can participate in Andy’s 12-month reading program, and what books Andy and Bridget are reading right now.

 

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:21] The topic is books — the top five recommendations from the world’s leading sales and marketing experts who have been guests on Accelerate!

[2:51] Number One, by far, is How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie, published in 1936, in the heart of the Great Depression. Carnegie had worked selling for Armour, and taught public speaking. It is as relevant today, as ever.

[5:56] Number Two is SPIN Selling, by Neil Rackham, a good basic book about B2B Sales, and the Spin model: Situation, Problem, Implication, Need-payoff. Bridget has taught SPIN selling. It is still very relevant to put in practice, company-wide.

[10:31] Number Three is The Challenger Sale, by Matthew Dixon and Brent Adamson. It is embraced by large enterprise, selling complex products.

[13:53] Number Four is Think and Grow Rich, by Napoleon Hill. This timeless classic for motivation and inspiration offers a 13-step formula for reaching goals.

[16:54] Number Five is actually a tie between four books: First, To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others, by Daniel Pink. Everybody is an influencer, even if not in sales. Most white-collar employees influence others in their jobs.

[18:15] Andy refers to Robert Cialdini’s term, ‘Influence Professional.’

[19:04] Also tied for Number Five, is New Sales. Simplified. The Essential Handbook for Prospecting and New Business Development, by Mike Weinberg. It is a modern classic, blunt and direct on what you can do better.

[20:25] Also tied for Number Five, is The Greatest Salesman in the World, by Og Mandino. It is a short parable that teaches behaviors for a lifetime of success and fulfillment.

[22:15] Finally, also tied for Number Five, is Zero-Time Selling: 10 Essential Steps To Accelerate Every Company's Sales, by your host, Andy Paul! It is a favorite of Bridget’s; she hopes it stays on the modern classics list — a quick read, widely applicable.

[23:38] Andy has prepared a 12-month reading list for clients. Contact Andy, to read along. Not homework! If you do it, as a manager you provide notebooks, and 15–20 minutes of the business day, for your people to read, and to journal.

 

BRIDGET’S BOOK RECOMMENDATION

To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others, by Daniel Pink, and How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie.

 

CONTACT BRIDGET GLEASON

Bridget is VP of Sales with Logz.io, in the U.S. office in Boston, and was previously VP of Corporate Sales at SumoLogic. Prior to that her recent experience includes being VP of Sales for Yesware and SVP of Worldwide Sales for Engine Yard. She can be contacted at Bridget@Logz.io.

LinkedIn: Bridget Gleason

Send your questions for Andy and Bridget to Andy@ZeroTimeSelling.com.

Jan 26, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Jon Miller, Founder and CEO of Engagio. Among the many topics that John and I discuss, are how Account-Based Everything (ABE) is not marketing automation but human engagement, methodically orchestrated, assisted by data; how ABE breaks down silos and aligns marketing and sales; and, how ABE shortens the time to revenue for the large, complex sale.  

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:46] Jon’s BS is in physics, studying fusion. He was accepted by MIT into a Ph.D. program, but, instead, followed his friends into management. Engagio is Jon’s second startup. He cofounded Marketo — recently bought by Visa Equity.

[3:28] With Marketo, Jon fished with a net for whatever they picked up. They tried reaching out to spear big fish with outbound marketing tactics, but Marketo was not a fit for that. Engagio was built as a platform for account based marketing.

[5:48] Until recently, marketing has been a lead-centric business, not an account-centric platform, as sales has been. When marketing and sales work together on the same accounts, they are more relevant, focused, and personalized.

[8:56] TOPO says marketing alone will only get about 15% penetration into the target accounts. What does penetrate better is the account based sales development function.

[10:16] Account based sales development, working independently from account based marketing, builds silos. Engagio works to build all functions together under the same tent: Account Based Everything, a phrase borrowed from TOPO.

[11:06] ABE is a strategy for aligning and orchestrating marketing, sales, sales development, and customer success, into personalized interactions across the account — both for new business and existing customers.

[13:03] How does the ABE approach gives a shorter time to revenue than marketing alone?

[15:34] Account based outbound lets you target big fish, reaching high into those accounts, using the challenger model to create the opportunity, which puts you in a strategic place.

[16:24] The traditional sales model for large account has many hand-offs. The ABE model involves everybody in an orchestrated process. There are no marketing deals or sales deals, but team deals.

[20:36] Jon uses two analogies for Engagio: the orchestra conductor, making sure the right people come in and out at the right time; and the football play mapped out in a diagram, emphasising the elements of the team.

[23:16] This is not marketing automation, but human engagement, methodically orchestrated, assisted by data. Jon explains how it is the opposite of sales spam.

MORE ABOUT JON MILLER

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
I come across very credible, as both a domain expert in my space, and also as a SaaS executive who has done this before.

Who is your sales role model?
The analyst firm TOPO, led by Craig Rosenberg; Trish Bertuzzi; Jason Lemkin at SaaStr.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
The Challenger Sale: Taking Control of the Customer Conversation, by Matthew Dixon and Brent Adamson

What music is on your playlist right now?

Hamilton soundtrack.

CONTACT JON MILLER

Website: Engagio.com

Books: Engagio.com/Guide

Jan 25, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest James Muir, sales trainer, speaker, coach, and author of The Perfect Close. Among the many topics that James and I discuss are why bad sales practices still abound, essential questions to help advance your buyer along their buying process and how facilitating the buying process builds trust.

 

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:38] James wrote this book to help sales professionals that are uncomfortable asking for commitments in manipulative ways.

[5:11] A majority of meetings with prospects conclude without the sales professional asking for a commitment. You need to go into any encounter with an idea of what you want the outcome to be. Use advancing questions, such as, “Does it make sense to X?”

[7:28] Andy makes the connection to Neil Rackham’s Spin Selling, and asks if the prospect today still needs to be prodded from stage to stage.

[10:14] Asking, “What’s a good next step?” may reveal internal procedures that need to occur before anything external. That tells you where they’re at in their buying process.

[11:51] 50–60% of qualified opportunities end in no decision because sales professionals make assumptions without making a compelling case to change the status quo.

[13:10] Advancing questions show at each step if more justification is needed before going forward. Complex sales, particularly, may slow from insufficient justification.

[19:29] Endowed progress means that the closer one is to achieving a goal, the more one accelerates toward the goal.

[20:28] Commitment consistency is a propensity to sustain commitments, based on the psychological need to maintain internal coherence. Robert Cialdini addresses this in Influence.

[24:39] James tells about a client who refused to work with a sales rep ‘with commission breath.’ Closers who serve themselves are not serving the customer. Be a facilitator.

 

MORE ABOUT JAMES MUIR

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
People share stuff with me.

Who is your sales role model?
Mahan Khalsa, author of Let’s Get Real, or Let’s Not Play.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
Consultative Selling: The Hanan Formula for High-Margin Sales at High Levels, by Mack Hanan, or Amp Up Your Sales: Powerful Strategies That Move Customers to Make Fast, Favorable Decisions, by Andy Paul.

What music is on your playlist right now?

Virtuoso guitar players of all different styles. Today it’s Joe Satriani’s, “Surfing With the Alien.”

 

CONTACT JAMES MUIR

Website: PureMuir.com

LinkedIn: PureMuir

Twitter: @TweetPureMuir

Amazon: The Perfect Close: The Secret To Closing Sales — The Best Selling Practices & Techniques For Closing The Deal,
by James M. Muir

Jan 24, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Ed Wallace, Founder and CEO of The Relational Capital Group, and author of a couple of great books: Business Relationships That Last: 5 Steps to Transform Contacts Into High Performing Relationships and The Relationship Engine: Connecting with the People Who Power Your Business. Among the many topics that Ed and I discuss are the steps to you can take to convert sales contacts into relationships, the engine that turns leadership connections into relationships and how you should assess and strengthen your business relationships.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[:54] A CPA ‘in recovery,’ Ed was a senior executive at Vertex for 20 years. He was their 9th employee and they sold $1M; when he left, they had 1,000 employees with $120M in sales.

[7:43] There is great potential to improve the existing business relationships you have. It takes time, and it’s difficult, but 90% of executives say relationships are the secret to their success.

[9:47] Ed describes the concepts of the relational ladder and the relationship engine. Each type is appropriate for specific circumstances, with different goals.

[13:52] Ed shares questions to assess the strength of your relationships and shares a process for building strong relationships.

[16:05] Given that you have good intentions toward your colleagues and customers, what is the central challenge of relational leadership?

[16:53] Ed offers to you, Andy’s listeners, to take the Relational Quotient test, an objective measure of 35 human business behaviors, such as email response, call-back time, etc.
[18:35] If you are not getting validation from the people with whom you are trying to build relationships, look at your credibility, integrity, and authenticity. Something is missing. There are no neutral interactions. Trust either rises or falls.

[24:30] Worthy intent is a promise to put the other person’s best interests at the forefront of the relationship. Trust is the inevitable consequence of worthy intent. Asking relevant, topical questions shows your worthy intent.

[26:29] Relational GPS means Goals, Passions, and Struggles. Learning and sharing relational GPS is the universal framework for every business relationship. Let it flow naturally; don’t ask. Ed shares a $10M GPS anecdote of a deal saved by credibility.

 

MORE ABOUT ED WALLACE

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
Listening.

Who is your sales role model?
Max the Taxicab driver, in my previous book.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: Uncommon Thoughts on Common Things, by Robert Fulghum.

What music is on your playlist right now?

Vintage Rolling Stones. Also The Beatles.

 

CONTACT ED WALLACE

Contact Ed: EdWallace@RelCapGroup.com

Website: RelationalCapitalGroup.com

For your free RQ Assessment go to the website and click to receive an access code by email. A salesperson will not call.

Jan 23, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Craig Wortmann, CEO and Founder of Sales Engine, Inc., a clinical professor of entrepreneurship at University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and author of the book, What's Your Story? Using Stories to Ignite Performance and Be More Successful. Among the many topics that Craig and I discuss are why need to create a Sales Trailer, a sales version of a movie trailer, to very quickly capture buyers’ attention, how to create a story matrix; why stories of failure can be so persuasive and how to set your buyers’ expectations.

 

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[1:52] Craig worked in a Congressional office in D.C., and joined IBM about 25 years ago, selling the AS/400 in Chicago. Craig credits IBM with great training that prepared him to teach entrepreneurial selling to MBA students.

[6:17] Craig teaches entrepreneurs how to survive, and then thrive, ‘in the wonderful chaos between time-zero and break-even.’

[7:19] Customers will not beat a path to your door; sales is not a subset of marketing; and, the time to hire a salesperson is after you have a sales model.

[10:54] Buyers will not work to understand your message. You have to work to be understood.

[13:29] Create a Sales Trailer. It’s like a movie trailer for sales. You don’t have four paragraphs to tell a prospect about your brand. You have eight seconds to capture their attention.

[14:05] Expectations start to get set in the qualifying phase. When does the qualifying phase begin, and how long do you take to qualify your prospect?

[15:31] The best salespeople can recognize when there’s not a fit, will say so, and will offer to connect the prospect with other resources that may serve their present needs.

[16:42] Entrepreneurial selling includes the step of resetting expectations, which is done in a short conversation after the close, preparing the client for customer success.

[20:38] What’s Your Story? introduces the story matrix, a tool you can use to to develop important messaging themes.

[23:26] Why do stories of failure affect in a positive way?

[26:46] Impact questions uncover better information. They dig deeper, cut broader, and have harder answers. Ask something about the business, the client should know, but doesn’t. Don’t ask impact questions before a conversation is on solid ground.

 

MORE ABOUT CRAIG WORTMANN

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
Simplicity. Being able to give people crisp answers.

Who is your sales role model?
Keith Harrell at IBM. He had a profound influence on me.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success,
by Adam Grant.

What music is on your playlist right now?

From the soundtrack of Money Monster, "What Makes The World Go Round? (MONEY!)", by Dan The Automator, featuring Del The Funky Homosapien.

 

CONTACT CRAIG WORTMANN

LinkedIn: Sales Engine

LinkedIn: Craig Wortmann

Website: SalesEngine.com

Twitter: @SalesEngine

Jan 21, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Philip Calvert, social media sales expert, and social media sales strategist, based in the UK. Among the many topics that Philip and I discuss, are Philip’s journey from financial service sales to social selling strategist, how LinkedIn gives salespeople a public face, how to use LinkedIn effectively and politely, and how social media can build bridges, but cannot close sales.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[5:10] As the founder of a networking site, Philip received invitations to speak about social media, not only for financial services, but for law, accounting, pharmaceuticals, etc.

[7:41] When Philip asks audiences  if they know why they’re on LinkedIn, hardly any hands go up. Unless you have been trained on it, you’ll never fully get the best out of it. LinkedIn is the website for your personal brand. People buy people.

[11:02] Everybody, in every organization, is potentially a salesperson. The social media philosophy of a business must be extremely clear, and in a policy book. E.g., “We encourage everybody to get involved, but don’t do anything stupid.”

[12:48] It starts with training people how to build a professional profile. Make sure to have a good photo and some human interest on your profile. List your interests in the Additional Information section, as searchable keywords, separated by commas.

[18:32] The ‘loose connection,’ concept includes connecting with everybody possible, except spammers. What does Philip say is the main function of social media?

[22:41] Social media can distract you with shiny new tech. “Give that a go,’ is not a strategy. Have a strategy about which platforms to use, and how, to create conversations, which can build relationships.

[26:24] Most people never bother to customize the LinkedIn connection request. Do it! Always connect from a person’s profile page, not from the LinkedIn suggestions list, so you can see their interests, to customize your note.

[28:04] What does Philip advise you to do when you get a notification that someone viewed your profile?

[31:43] Use courtesy and common sense to determine the best way to start building a relationship with the person you find on LinkedIn. It may be through LinkedIn, or it may be to pick up the phone, or send an email.

MORE ABOUT PHILIP CALVERT

What’s your most powerful sales attribute?
Speaking.

Who is your sales role model?
Denis Waitley, Tom Peters, Elon Musk.

What’s one book that every salesperson should read?
Get More Referrals Now! The Four Cornerstones That Turn Business Relationships Into Gold, by Bill Cates.

What music is on your playlist right now?

Joe Bonamassa, Glenn Hughes, Metallica.

CONTACT PHILIP CALVERT

Website: PhilipCalvert.com

Twitter: @PhilipCalvert

LinkedIn: Social Media Speaker

Jan 20, 2017

Welcome to another Front Line Friday with my very special guest, Bridget Gleason. On this week’s episode, Bridget and I discuss, among other topics, how she is hiring a sales team for her new position of V.P. of Sales at Logz.io, how far Tel Aviv is from San Francisco, and even Boston, how to accommodate account executives with relocation issues, and how complex sales need a complex infrastructure.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[3:04] Bridget’s new job of V.P. of Sales at Logz.io has her looking for technical account executives in the Boston and
San Francisco areas. Her contact information is below!

[3:51] Bridget is, once again, setting up a sales organization from scratch. Challenge number one is time and geography. Her company is a startup, based in Tel Aviv, 10 hours ahead of San Francisco and seven hours ahead of Boston.

[4:56] Learning how to set up and manage distributed teams in a global market is something we will all have to learn to do well. Here in the U.S., Bridget is not geographically optimal for Logz.io. Boston is better than San Francisco, for time overlap.

[7:53] The sales model Bridget is building, is an inside/hybrid role. There will be an SDR team, helping filter inbound and making outbound. There will be account executives, with some experience in SMB mid-market, looking to grow their careers.

[10:18] The biggest challenge of remote management is where people are located, vs. where they are needed. Where should they optimize their talent? Great talent is really hard to find.

[13:44] Great employees are requiring flexibility on where to live. Can they be accommodated and still cohere into a team?

[16:04] Bridget looks for people who are self-directed, motivated, smart, and curious, and who have integrity, that have some affinity for technology.

[17:10] Andy looks for big-picture ‘systems thinkers,’ for the kind of sales role under discussion. He looks at what they have done so far, and he asks them probing questions.

[20:26] In Bridget’s view, there is one team — not a U.S. team, and a Tel Aviv team. She looks for team-oriented people.

[22:03] Andy describes a $1B company that does not have a sales function. They have project teams that sell. That team mentality and cooperation are needed for complex deals.

CONTACT BRIDGET GLEASON

Bridget is VP of Sales with Logz.io, in the U.S. office in Boston, and was previously VP of Corporate Sales at SumoLogic. Prior to that her recent experience includes being VP of Sales for Yesware and SVP of Worldwide Sales for Engine Yard. She can be contacted at Bridget@Logz.io.

LinkedIn: Bridget Gleason

Send your questions for Andy and Bridget to Andy@ZeroTimeSelling.com.

Jan 19, 2017

Joining me on this episode of Accelerate! is my guest Dr. Robert Cialdini, New York Times bestselling author, with three million copies of his books sold. Dr. Cialdini is known for his international best-selling book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, as well as his latest book, Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade. Dr. Cialdini is the Regent’s Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing at Arizona State University, as well as the President and CEO of Influence at Work. Among the topics Dr. Cialdini and I discuss are how his own experience of being “a pushover” led him to research how people are influenced to make decisions; the six (now seven) central precepts of influence and how to use “pre-suasion” to prime prospects to receive the value of your messaging.

 

KEY TAKEAWAYS

[2:36] Robert says he’s always been a pushover to buy things he didn’t want, and to make contributions to causes he didn’t know, while people walked away with his money. This is why he started studying the psychology of influence.

[3:56] He wrote Influence to inform people how to recognize and resist unwelcome influences upon themselves. All of his clients, though, want to harness influence, not to deflect it.

[6:34] If we tap into those fundamental motivations that are universal to humanity, then we have a set of influence tools that will be most successful over the widest set of situations and populations.

[7:07] The 6 key precepts of influence.

[15:11] A tactic used on American POWs during the Korean War, was to ask for a neutral agreement before asking for a big one. The agreement mentally turned them from prisoners to assistants. This also works, to turn prospects to customers.

[18:34] Dr. Cialdini once found he was influenced to make a contribution to a man at his door, who had presented no credentials, and no evidence of validity. Dr. Cialdini made a donation, and felt good about it,  until he realized how he had been influenced.

[21:28] Savvy communicators Pre-Suade, before they deliver their message. It is not changing a person’s mind, but changing their state of mind, so that they willingly receive your message.

[23:39] If you want to sell by quality, rather than price, show an environment of quality in your marketing materials. Dr. Cialdini tells of a study of clouds vs. pennies for landing page backgrounds, for a furniture store. Listen, for what happened!

[28:37] What has been most recently elevated to top-of-mind, when you’re about to make your pitch? That is what will determine how receptive people will be to it.

[29:20] Dr. Cialdini discovered a seventh principle of influence: Unity (being one of us). People say, “yes” in the boundaries of, “we.” Point to existing memberships you share before you ask. Ask advice (as of a partner), not opinion (as of a customer).

[36:37] These principles work effectively in person. But even in an email, if we start it with a personalizing, connecting message, then that re-establishes the human basis for exchange.

[38:37] Andy recommends to all his listeners to read both books: Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, and, Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade.

CONTACT DR. ROBERT CIALDINI

Website: InfluenceAtWork.com for all books, tapes, or to book a presentation.

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